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Die Vrou
8th August 2014, 09:09
The magic of black flowers has attracted our attention for centuries. Black roses appear to originate from a fairytale world. Their improbable and "unnatural" color inspires a powerful feeling of mystical expectation.

The color black has always been synonymous with death and mourning. It is thus the color of sadness and farewell. So, many people consider black roses to symbolize bereavement, loss and mortality. They are often used at funerals. A single black rose might be sent by a close friend and/or loved one leaving for a war or on a journey from which he did not expect to return.

But, a more positive meaning does exist for the black rose. It is true that black is the color of death. But death does not always cause mourning. It can also be the beginning of new things, a journey into unexplored territory.

The black rose, because it symbolizes death and passing away, also indicates a major change or upheaval in the future. In that sense, the black rose also means the death of old habits and the old order. It inspires confidence and enthusiasm by signaling the birth of a new era of hope and joy.

The black rose, tragic in its dark beauty is not always symbolic of unhappiness. The Irish have used the lyrics of "the Little Black rose" during their ongoing battle with the British. Similarly, many anarchist and antiauthoritarian groups have also adopted the black rose as a symbol of mutiny and strength. Therefore, the meaning of the black rose also includes courage and resistance.

Die Vrou
9th August 2014, 21:47
Not only would I like to use this thread as History of our guild, but also as a thread that commemorates the black rose story.

The black rose has been used to symbolize the start of new things or a major change in the direction of life. For some, it has been used to inspire enthusiasm and signal a new lease on life. The biggest proponents of the black roses' positive meanings are the Irish. During their never ending battle with the British, the Irish have used the lyrics of "The Little Black Roses" to symbolize their courage and resistance to the opposition. There have been various groups who have used the black rose to be a symbol for their strength and will to stand up against the government who go against their anarchist ways.

"Róisín Dubh" (pronounced Ro-sheen dove), meaning "Black Rose", written in the 16th century, is one of Ireland's most famous political songs. It is based on an older love-lyric which referred to the poet's beloved rather than, as here, being a metaphor for Ireland. The intimate tone of the original carries over into the political song. It is often attributed to Antoine Ó Raifteiri, but almost certainly predates him.[1] Originally translated from the Irish language by James Clarence Mangan, this translation is credited to Pádraig Pearse.

The little black rose
Little Rose, be not sad for all that hath behapped thee:
The friars are coming across the sea, they march on the main.
From the Pope shall come thy pardon, and from Rome, from the East-
And stint not Spanish wine to my Little Black Rose.

Long the journey that I made with her from yesterday till today,
Over mountains did I go with her, under the sails upon the sea,
The Erne I passed by leaping, though wide the flood,
And there was string music on each side of me and my Little Black Rose!

Thou hast slain me, O my bride, and may it serve thee no whit,
For the soul within me loveth thee, not since yesterday nor today,
Thou has left me weak and broken in mien and in shape,
Betray me not who love thee, my Little Black Rose!

I would walk the dew with thee and the meadowy wastes,
In hope of getting love from thee, or part of my will,
Frangrant branch, thou didst promise me that thou hadst for me love-
And sure the flower of all Munster is Little Black Rose!

Had I a yoke of horses I would plough against the hills,
In middle-Mass I'd make a gospel of my Little Black Rose,
I'd give a kiss to the young girl that would give her mouth to me,
And behind the liss would lie embracing my Little Black Rose!

The Erne shall rise in rude torrents, hills shall be rent,
The sea shall roll in red waves, and blood be poured out,
Every mountain glen in Ireland, and the bogs shall quake
Some day ere shall perish my Little Black Rose!