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Thread: Priester van On

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Priester van On

    Quote Originally Posted by Willekat View Post
    Dag weereens

    Die ou man - wat het die priester van On nou met die wit boek in gemeen. Ek het nog glad nie die wit boek gelees nie en kan dus nie weet nie, maar ek kom agter dat daar tog n konneksie moet wees as jy dit onder heirdie afdeling van die wit boek geplaas het.

    Kat
    Soos wat die Christendom se wortels diep in die gebruike van ons heidense voorvaders lê, is die wortels van die nuwe geloof wat Moses gebring het, diep gesetel in die leringe van die Priester van On aan wie se voete hy geleer het.

    Handelinge 7.

    20 In dié tyd is Moses gebore, en hy was wonderlik mooi. Drie maande lank is hy in die huis van sy vader versorg;

    21 en toe hy weggegooi is, het Farao se dogter hom opgeneem en hom as haar seun grootgemaak.

    22 En Moses is opgelei in al die wysheid van die Egiptenaars en was magtig in woorde en dade.

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    Default Re: Priester van On

    Goeiemiddag,

    Ek soek nog na skrywes en het hierdie een in Wikipedia gekry oor die vaders van die woestyn waar dit dan ook eindig met: Vader Moses.

    The Desert Fathers were Hermits, Ascetics and Monks who lived mainly in the Scetes desert of Egypt, beginning around the third century. They were the first Christian hermits, who abandoned the cities of the pagan world to live in solitude. These original desert hermits were Christians fleeing the chaos and persecution of the Roman Empire's Crisis of the Third Century. They were men who did not believe in letting themselves be passively guided and ruled by a decadent state. Christians were often scapegoated during these times of unrest, and near the end of the century, the Diocletianic Persecution was more severe and systematic. In Egypt, refugee communities formed at the edges of population centers, far enough away to be safe from Imperial scrutiny.

    In 313, when Christianity was made legal in Egypt by Diocletian's successor Constantin, a trickle of individuals, many of them young men, continued to live in these marginal areas. The solitude of these places attracted them because the privations of the desert were a means of learning stoic self-discipline. Such self-discipline was modelled after the examples of Jesus' fasting in the desert and of his cousin John the Baptist (himself a desert hermit). These individuals believed that desert life would teach them to eschew the things of this world and allow them to follow God's call in a more deliberate and individual way.

    Thus, during the fourth century, the empty areas around Egyptian cities continued to attract others from the world over, wishing to live in solitude. As the lifestyle developed, these men and women developed a reputation for holiness and wisdom. In its early form, each hermit followed more or less an individual spiritual program, perhaps learning some basic practices from other monks, but developing them into their own unique (and sometimes highly idiosyncratic) practice. Later monks, notably Anthony the Great, Pachomius and Shenouda the Archimandrite, developed a more regularized approach to desert life, and introduced some aspects of community living (especially common prayer and meals) that would eventually develop into cenobitic monasticism. Many individuals who spent part of their lives in the Egyptian desert went on to become important figures in the Church and society of the fourth and fifth century, among them Athanasius of Alexandria, John Chrysostom, and John Cassian. Through the work of the John Cassian and Augustine of Hippo the spirituality of the desert fathers, emphasizing an ascent to God through periods of purgation and illumination that led to unity with the Divine, deeply affected the spirituality of the Western Church and the Eastern Church. For this reason, the writings and spirituality of the desert fathers are still of interest to many people today.

    No Christian state
    Even after Christianity became a legal religion of the Roman Empire in 313, the fact that the Emperor could now be a Christian and that the world was coming to know Christianity and the Cross as a sign of temporal power only strengthened the hermits' resolve. For the hermits there was really no such thing as a "Christian" state. They doubted the fact the religion and politics could ever be mixed to such an extent as to produce a fully Christian society. For them the only Christian society was spiritual and extra-mundane.

    Primacy of love
    In the sayings of the Desert Fathers, there was insistence on the primacy of love over everything else in spiritual life, over knowledge, gnosis, asceticism, contemplation, solitude, prayer. Without love the exercises of the spirit lose all meaning. Their idea of love was not sentiment but spiritual identification with one's brother; taking one's neighbor as one's self. The full difficulty and magnitude of the task of loving others is recognized everywhere and never minimized. They understood that it is very hard to love others in the full sense of the word and that it involved a kind of death of their own being.

    Purity of heart
    The basic principle of the Desert Life was that God is the Authority and that apart from His manifest will there are few or no principles. St. Anthony said,. "therefore whatever you see your soul to desire according to God, do that thing, and you shall keep your heart safe." The Desert life started out with a clean break from the world. A life continued in compunction which taught the monk to lament the attachment to unreal values. The Desert Fathers lived a life of solitude, labour, poverty, fasting, charity and prayer. This purging allowed for the emergence of the true secret self in which the believer and Christ were "one spirit." The end of all striving was purity of heart which culminated in a clear unobstructed vision of the true state of affairs and an intuitive grasp of one's inner reality anchored in God.

    Some Sayings of the Desert Fathers
    One of the Elders, "It is not because of evil thoughts that we are condemned, but only because we make use of these evil thoughts."
    Abbot Pastor, "If someone does evil to you, you should do good to him, so that by your good work you may drive out his malice."
    An Elder, "A man who keeps death before his eyes will at all times overcome his cowardliness."
    Blessed Macarius said, "This is the truth, if a monk regards contempt a praise, poverty as riches, and hunger as a feast, he will never die."
    Abba Moses, "Sit in thy cell and thy cell will teach thee all."



    Groete en aangename dag.

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    Default Re: Priester van On

    The-Instruction-of-Amenemope.jpg
    Amenemopet
    The Instruction of Amenemope, which has been dated within the
    broad limits of 1000–600 bce. The Hebrew author apparently used
    this work as a model—the Egyptian work comprises 30 chapters,
    and the Hebrew text refers to its “thirty sayings”


    Die Wysheid van Amenemopet is ca 1300–1075 vC in Egipte deur die Egiptiese skrifgeleerde Amenemope seun van Kanakht opgestel.

    Die ooreenkoms tussen die Egiptiese Wysheid van Amenemopet en die Hebreeuse Spreuke van Salomo is opvallend. Daar word geredelik aanvaar dat die Bybelboek Spreuke put uit die Wysheid van Amenemopet.
    By the 1960s there was a virtual consensus among scholars in support of the priority of Amenemope and its influence on Proverbs. For example, John A. Wilson declared in the mid-20th century: "We believe that there is a direct connection between these two pieces of wisdom literature, and that Amen-em-Opet was the ancestor text. The secondary nature of the Hebrew seems established."

    Many study Bibles and commentaries followed suit, including the Jerusalem Bible, introductions to the Old Testament by Pfeiffer and Eissfeldt, and others. The translators of the Catholic New American Bible, reflecting and extending this agreement, even went so far as to emend the obscure Hebrew text of Proverbs 22:19 (traditionally translated as "I have made known to you this day, even to you") to read "I make known to you the words of Amen-em-Ope." Source
    Attached Images Attached Images

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