Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Do plants have feelings?

  1. #1
    Member Die Vrou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Vaal Triangle
    Age
    54
    Posts
    346
    Blog Entries
    10
    Total Downloaded
    0
    Rep Power
    45

    Default Do plants have feelings?

    J C Bose: The Little Known Story of How India’s First Biophysicist Proved Plants Have Life

    by Sanchari Pal November 30, 2016

    A man whose genius transcended boundaries, Bose was a quintessential polymath: a physicist, a biologist, a botanist, an archaeologist, an author, and a connoisseur of fine arts.

    bose_2_pics.jpg
    Jagdish Chandra Bose

    He was the first person from the Indian subcontinent to receive a US patent and is considered one of the fathers of radio science, alongside such notables as Tesla, Marconi, and Popov. He was elected Fellow of the Royal Society in 1920, becoming the first Indian to be honoured by the Royal Society in the field of science.

    However, like most pioneering scientists, Bose was famed for his more controversial pursuits – his experiments in plant physiology during the 1900s that drew some startling inferences. On his 158th birth anniversary, we bring you the story of J C Bose’s path-breaking work on the discovery of plant stimuli.

    Having graduated with a BA (Physical Sciences) from Kolkata University, Bose was teaching physics at the Presidency College while simultaneously pursuing his own research in electricity and electromagnetic waves. In November 1894, for the first time in the world, Bose gave a demonstration of microwaves at the Kolkata Town Hall, where he ignited gunpowder and rang a bell at a distance by using microwaves.

    He also developed an improved ‘coherer’ (a device that detects radio waves) – the first to use a semiconductor junction – but was unwilling to patent it. Bose believed that science should be for the benefit of humankind and one should not make money from it. However, under pressure from his friends, he finally submitted a patent application to the US patent office and on March 29, 1904, he became the first Indian to get a US patent for his “detector of electrical disturbances”. Interestingly, Bose’s coherer was the one used by Guglielmo Marconi to build an operational two-way radio.

    crescograph.jpg
    The Crescograph

    Perhaps it was his work in radio waves that made Bose believe physics could go far beyond what was apparent to the naked eye. He had always been fascinated by the plant reactions seen in sensitive plants like the mimosa, which, when irritated, will react with the sudden shedding or shrinking of its leaves. So, curious about the secret world of plants, Bose switched his attention to investigating how plants respond to stimuli.

    To do this, he invented the crescograph, an early oscillating recorder using clockwork gears and a smoked glass plate to measure the growth and movements of plants in increments as small as 1/100,000 of an inch. The plate caught the reflection of the plant and it was marked according to the movement of the plant. His first experiments were conducted with a leaf, a carrot and a turnip plucked from his garden.

    Bose strongly believed that plants had a sensitive nervous system, not unlike that of animals, and that their responses to external stimuli could be measured and recorded. His belief was strengthened by the results of his experiments. For instance, in one of his experiments, the plant was dipped in bromide (a poison). The pulse beat of the plant, shown as a light spot on the smoked plate, became unsteady once the plant started taking in the poison, proving that plants have life.

    Encouraged by the results of this experiment, Bose began studying how plants behave differently under different environmental factors such as temperature, chemicals, electricity, gases and humidity. The more responses he got from his plants, the more detailed his efforts became. Bose was astounded to discover that an electric death spasm occurs in plants when they die, and that the actual moment of death in a plant could be accurately recorded. As he later wrote:

    “All around us, the plants are communicating. We just don’t notice it.”

    Determined to reveal the wonders of plant perception to the world, Bose described his experiments and their results in his 1902 paper,”Responses in the Living and Non-Living”. He wrote how plants grew more quickly when exposed to nice music and gentle whispers, and poorly when exposed to harsh music and loud speech. He even mentioned how plants became depressed when exposed to polluted air and darkening skies. In short, his work showed that plants could feel pleasure and they could feel pain.

    Though Bose’s research had its usual share of naysayers, his invention of the crescograph received widespread acclaim, particularly from the Path Congress of Science in 1900. The publication of his paper by the Royal Society created greater interest and numerous invitations were extended to him. During his fourth scientific mission to Britain in 1914, Bose set up his private laboratory at Maida Vale which was visited by distinguished men from all walks of life.

    Scientists from the Royal and Linnean societies came to see Bose’s experiments with plant perception. In a famous incident, the ever-curious playwright George Bernard Shaw was seized with horror when subjected to the sight of a violently convulsing piece of cabbage gasping in a pot of boiling water. While Bose’s work with plants was highly esteemed by some scientists, the disdain of the Western scientific circles for an Indian scientist’s work can be seen in the way British journalists described Bose’s work with plants in terms similar to Frankenstein-like experiments (like the account at the beginning of the story).

    However, his path-breaking experiments couldn’t be ignored for long. In 1920, he was elected the Fellow of the Royal Society for his amazing contributions and achievements. Prior to his death in 1937, he also set up the Bose Research Institute at Calcutta (now Kolkata). He was greatly helped in this endeavour by his close friend Rabindranath Tagore, who contributed financially and also backed him in his efforts.

    An avid supporter of Bose’s researches and discoveries, Tagore had always found an essence of Indian scientific spirit, a reflection of Indian national culture, in Bose’s work. In his poem for Bose, published in Kalpana, Tagore, addressing the scientist, was effusive in his praise:

    From the Temple of Science in the West,

    far across the Indus, oh, my friend,

    you have brought the garland of victory,

    decorated the humbled head of the poor Mother …

    Today, the mother has sent blessings in words of tears,

    of this unknown poet.

    Amidst the great Scholars of the West, brother,

    these words will reach only your ears.

    As Tagore’s words portray, for a country in the clutches of colonial rule, J C Bose was not just a scientist, he was a symbol of national pride. Bose too had always acknowledged his responsibilities as a scientist to revive the national pride of his country. In a letter to Tagore, he wrote:

    “I am alive with the life force of the mother Earth, I have prospered with the help of the love of my countrymen. For ages, the sacrificial fire of India’s enlightenment has been kept burning, millions of Indians are protecting it with their lives, a small spark of which has reached this country through me.”

    Today, the legendary scientist may no longer be with us, but his legacy shall endure forever. Over the decades, several scientists have given further weight to Bose’s theories that plants may not be as different from animals as previously thought. It is only fitting that the team of scientists that hopes to complete and carry his work forward should choose to run their research at Kolkata’s Bose Research Institute and call it, although informally, the JC Bose Legacy Project. At the Institute’s Madhyamgram campus, work is on to decode the molecular mystery of plants (in terms of protein and genes) that show different responses to external stimuli such as touch, light or noise.










    Everything in my Spiritual history lives and breathes in me, I am unique, I am special,
    and that is what is making me strong.

  2. #2
    Mod knipmes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Polokwane
    Age
    58
    Posts
    612
    Blog Entries
    7
    Total Downloaded
    0
    Rep Power
    60

    Default Re: Do plants have feelings?

    So tong in die kies geseg....

    Daar word gereken dat slaai die wonder ete is...
    As ek moeg word vir rooi vleis, en 'n breek vat om die gestel so 'n bietjie te laat herstel... dan eet ek hoender, die lekkerste slaai ooit!!!

    maar wie kan tog ooit by 'n dieet hou??? ...as ek kom kry...

    'n tjoppie in elke hand?






    groetnis
    knipmes

  3. #3
    Mod knipmes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Polokwane
    Age
    58
    Posts
    612
    Blog Entries
    7
    Total Downloaded
    0
    Rep Power
    60

    Default Re: Do plants have feelings?

    Maar natuurlik het plante gevoelens...

    my Wederhelfte praat daagliks met haar "Violette" soos sy dit noem, en hul blom sterek!

    Grappies opsy gestoot!

    Die Boer is van nature een met die natuur, en weet dat alle lewende wesens, wat dier en plant insluit, presies weet wat aangaan, en met ons kommunikeer op 'n voortdurende basis... dis wat ons sulke bobaas Boere maak, ons Goddelike gawe van een wees met die natuur!


    groetnis
    knipmes

  4. #4
    Member Silencio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Bloemfontein
    Age
    38
    Posts
    208
    Total Downloaded
    0
    Rep Power
    40

    Default Re: Do plants have feelings?

    Dit is bewys dat mense wat plante het en versorg met hul plante "praat", aan hul plante raak en positiewe "gedagtes" wissel met die plant. dit is bewys om terapeuties te wees vir mense maar ook plante groei sterker deur hierdie vertroeteling, wel miskien is ek 'n paar varkies los maar ek doen dit en ai die goed groei te mooi, maar die feit bly ons eet plante.

    groetnis
    Silencio
    Cause and effect applies to us all, consider therefore your thoughts, words and actions carefully.

  5. #5
    Member Die Vrou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Vaal Triangle
    Age
    54
    Posts
    346
    Blog Entries
    10
    Total Downloaded
    0
    Rep Power
    45

    Default Re: Do plants have feelings?

    Silencio

    Re: Do plants have feelings?
    Dit is bewys dat mense wat plante het en versorg met hul plante "praat", aan hul plante raak en positiewe "gedagtes" wissel met die plant. dit is bewys om terapeuties te wees vir mense maar ook plante groei sterker deur hierdie vertroeteling, wel miskien is ek 'n paar varkies los maar ek doen dit en ai die goed groei te mooi, maar die feit bly ons eet plante.

    groetnis
    Silencio

    Ja, ek het dit met my eie oë gesien toe my man met die roosboompie sonder enige blaartjies gepraat en vertroetel het in drie dae was dieselfde boompie vol pienk blomme. Die eindresultaat van liefde! Enige lewende wese soek liefde en reageer daarop deur mooi te blom of waar nie blomme is nie net mooi en goed te vertoon. jy is nie jou varkies kwyt nie dit is mooi en reg as jy jou plante ook goed versorg. Hulle is soos diere en mense het ook vertroosting en liefde en nodig, alhoewel hulle stom is kan mens op die plant of boom se voorkoms sien hoe dit met hom/haar gegaan het in hulle lewenstydperk.

    Wanneer daar nie wedersydse belangstelling is tussen die plant en sy eienaar nie dan gaan hulle ook eindelik dood of wanneer daar nie verstaan word hoe die plant versorg moet word nie.

    Ons eet ook diere! Dit is dieselfde ding. Daar is ook ander wesens wat weer van ons liggaam af moet lewe, party is onsigbaar ander weer sigbaar soos kieme, virusse, muskiete, luise ens.

    Selfs uit jou liggaam wanneer dit doodgaan kom daar weer lewende wesens uit om jou liggaam op te eet hulle leef van jou liggaam af.

    Liefde groete

    Die Vrou..
    Everything in my Spiritual history lives and breathes in me, I am unique, I am special,
    and that is what is making me strong.

  6. #6
    Member Diamand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Vereeniging
    Age
    31
    Posts
    3
    Total Downloaded
    0
    Rep Power
    0

    Default Re: Do plants have feelings?

    Hi,

    Ek het iewers gehoor dat n persoon ook soos jy geredeneer het. Hulle het later n leuen verklikker gebruik om te toets of plante gevoelens bv soos angs, pyn ens kan ervaar. Die toetse het wel gewys dat plante reaksies het tot pyn en vrees, dat dit so ver gaan as 2 plante langs mekaar is hulle presies kan uitken wie die een langs hom seer maak of beskadig. Ek kan ongelukkig nie onthou wie dit is nie omdat so ver ek weet daar n video op you tube is van die toetse.

    Groete
    D

  7. #7
    Mod knipmes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Polokwane
    Age
    58
    Posts
    612
    Blog Entries
    7
    Total Downloaded
    0
    Rep Power
    60

    Default Re: Do plants have feelings?

    Quote Originally Posted by Die Vrou View Post
    ...uit jou liggaam wanneer dit doodgaan kom daar weer lewende wesens uit om jou liggaam op te eet hulle leef van jou liggaam af...

    Dis nie net vir eet nie... ek sal vir hulle d&nn%r!!!

    laat my dink aan die grappie van 'n ou oom wat vir almal vertelle het dat hy nou moeg gelewe is en net wil he dat ou Petrus 'n Engel moet stuur om hom te kom haal!!!!

    Een middernag kom klop 'n klomp kwaaijongens aan die deur, die ou man vra "wie's daar?"

    Die een seg "Dis die Engel Gabrieel, ek is hier om jou te kom haal!"


    Reken die ou oom hom:

    "Nee man, die ou man na wie jy soek, bly lankal nie meer hier nie!!!!!"






    groetnis
    knipmes

  8. #8
    Stefanus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Bloemfontein
    Age
    56
    Posts
    1,606
    Blog Entries
    1
    Total Downloaded
    477.1 KB
    Videos
    128
    Rep Power
    10

    Default Plants Have Feelings Too – The Brutal Truth Every Vegan Needs to See

    Plants Have Feelings Too – The Brutal Truth Every Vegan Needs to See

    plants_have_feelings_too_vegans.jpg

    Although vegans love pointing out that animal consciousness and sentience are scientifically confirmed, most vegans remain unwilling to conflate physiological plant perception (the ability of plants to sense and adjust to their environment) with paranormal plant perception (the idea that plants are sentient and experience pain and fear). How convenient for them!

    Non-vegans, however, are much more open-minded in this department. It is not uncommon – and in fact something would be remiss – if we didn’t see comments like these on pro-vegan social media posts:

    • "Plants are live creatures and they are cruelly killed for vegans pleasure and consumption. :-p"
    • “The fact remains the same for me, you, and anyone else to live something must die whether it's an animal or plant it all the same.”
    • “That lettuce, it had a brother.”
    • "Plants feel pain, vegans are monsters."
    • “Plants have feelings too!”

    Often infuriated by such statements, many vegans predictably reply that plant sentience is regarded as pseudoscience, or that animal agriculture actually dramatically increases the amount of plants “killed” for food. They may even imply that the concern is disingenuous, asking why it's only brought up in an anti-vegan context and not, say, in response to dog or wildlife rescue, or when firefighters save pets but leave behind houseplants.
    Enough!

    It’s time for my fellow vegans to stop being so obtuse, open their eyes, and face the truth of their choices: there is really no difference between eating plants and animals.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •